WordPress with Kubernetes

Deploy a WordPress site using GKE Sandbox

This page shows you how to deploy a sample WordPress site using GKE Sandbox.

Before you begin

Take the following steps to enable the Kubernetes Engine API:

  1. Visit the Kubernetes Engine page in the Google Cloud Platform Console.
  2. Create or select a project.

Creating a node pool with gVisor enabled

Create a node pool inside your cluster with option --sandbox type=gvisor added to the command, like below:

gcloud beta container node-pools create sandbox-pool --cluster=${CLUSTER_NAME} --image-type=cos_containerd --sandbox type=gvisor

If you prefer to use the console, select your cluster and select the ADD NODE POOL button:

+ ADD NODE POOL

Then select the Image type with Containerd and select Enable sandbox with gVisor option. Select other options as you like:

+ NODE POOL

Check that gVisor is enabled

The gvisor RuntimeClass is instantiated during node creation. You can check for the existence of the gvisor RuntimeClass using the following command:

kubectl get runtimeclasses

Wordpress deployment

Now, let’s deploy a WordPress site using GKE Sandbox. WordPress site requires two pods: web server in the frontend, MySQL database in the backend. Both applications use PersistentVolumes to store the site data data. In addition, they use secret store to share MySQL password between them.

First, let’s download the deployment configuration files to add the runtime class annotation to them:

curl -LO https://k8s.io/examples/application/wordpress/wordpress-deployment.yaml
curl -LO https://k8s.io/examples/application/wordpress/mysql-deployment.yaml

Add a spec.template.spec.runtimeClassName set to gvisor to both files, as shown below:

wordpress-deployment.yaml:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: wordpress
  labels:
    app: wordpress
spec:
  ports:
    - port: 80
  selector:
    app: wordpress
    tier: frontend
  type: LoadBalancer
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: PersistentVolumeClaim
metadata:
  name: wp-pv-claim
  labels:
    app: wordpress
spec:
  accessModes:
    - ReadWriteOnce
  resources:
    requests:
      storage: 20Gi
---
apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: wordpress
  labels:
    app: wordpress
spec:
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: wordpress
      tier: frontend
  strategy:
    type: Recreate
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: wordpress
        tier: frontend
    spec:
      runtimeClassName: gvisor   # ADD THIS LINE
      containers:
      - image: wordpress:4.8-apache
        name: wordpress
        env:
        - name: WORDPRESS_DB_HOST
          value: wordpress-mysql
        - name: WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD
          valueFrom:
            secretKeyRef:
              name: mysql-pass
              key: password
        ports:
        - containerPort: 80
          name: wordpress
        volumeMounts:
        - name: wordpress-persistent-storage
          mountPath: /var/www/html
      volumes:
      - name: wordpress-persistent-storage
        persistentVolumeClaim:
          claimName: wp-pv-claim

mysql-deployment.yaml:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Service
metadata:
  name: wordpress-mysql
  labels:
    app: wordpress
spec:
  ports:
    - port: 3306
  selector:
    app: wordpress
    tier: mysql
  clusterIP: None
---
apiVersion: v1
kind: PersistentVolumeClaim
metadata:
  name: mysql-pv-claim
  labels:
    app: wordpress
spec:
  accessModes:
    - ReadWriteOnce
  resources:
    requests:
      storage: 20Gi
---
apiVersion: apps/v1
kind: Deployment
metadata:
  name: wordpress-mysql
  labels:
    app: wordpress
spec:
  selector:
    matchLabels:
      app: wordpress
      tier: mysql
  strategy:
    type: Recreate
  template:
    metadata:
      labels:
        app: wordpress
        tier: mysql
    spec:
      runtimeClassName: gvisor   # ADD THIS LINE
      containers:
      - image: mysql:5.6
        name: mysql
        env:
        - name: MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD
          valueFrom:
            secretKeyRef:
              name: mysql-pass
              key: password
        ports:
        - containerPort: 3306
          name: mysql
        volumeMounts:
        - name: mysql-persistent-storage
          mountPath: /var/lib/mysql
      volumes:
      - name: mysql-persistent-storage
        persistentVolumeClaim:
          claimName: mysql-pv-claim

Note that apart from runtimeClassName: gvisor, nothing else about the Deployment has is changed.

You are now ready to deploy the entire application. Just create a secret to store MySQL’s password and apply both deployments:

kubectl create secret generic mysql-pass --from-literal=password=${YOUR_SECRET_PASSWORD_HERE?}
kubectl apply -f mysql-deployment.yaml
kubectl apply -f wordpress-deployment.yaml

Wait for the deployments to be ready and an external IP to be assigned to the Wordpress service:

watch kubectl get service wordpress

Now, copy the service EXTERNAL-IP from above to your favorite browser to view and configure your new WordPress site.

Congratulations! You have just deployed a WordPress site using GKE Sandbox.

What’s next

To learn more about GKE Sandbox and how to run your deployment securely, take a look at the documentation.